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January 20, 2009
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Dec 6, 2005, 11:30:56 AM
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My Flooded Kitchen by wolfepaw My Flooded Kitchen by wolfepaw
This is a photograph looking into our kitchen about 3 months after Hurricane Katrina struck New Orleans. If you look closely at the right side, you can see a cabinet door hanging open. If you look very carefully, leaning on that door is a Portmeirion milk pitcher just leaning against the open door. It was like that in a picture my husband's brother sent us in the beginning of November 2005. That pitcher was still leaning on that door when we finally first got back to check out our house in December 2005. We were incredulous that it was just leaning up against that door with nothing else to hold it in that cabinet. It wasn't even scratched or chipped. Our Portmeirion was about the only thing we could salvage from our house. It was a sad day.
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:iconleawiggins:
LeaWiggins Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009
Oh my, I can't imagine that scale of loss of personal possessions.
It might sound trite, but 'things' can be replaced and people can't. I have never been one to be that much into things, (computer excluded, I might add). :rofl: I'm just so glad you and your hubby are still here. So many people lost their lives. I have a friend who is a former physician, and he volunteered his services in the aftermath of Katrina.
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:iconwolfepaw:
wolfepaw Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Thank you for those kind words. :hug: I've never been into possessions either (computer excluded, as well). But to lose everything was a bit different. To have to replace everything in the kitchen, the bathroom, tools, yard stuff, and on and on. It was amazing. But we were lucky. And thanks to people like your friend, the people who lost so much found some much needed help and support. A lot of us owe a huge debt of thanks to the people who did so much to ease the pain.
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:iconleawiggins:
LeaWiggins Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009
Oh, I can only imagine. I knew some of the people who got hit in Texas and they lost homes and possessions as well. I used to complain about living in the center of the country. Fairly cold winters, although not nearly as bad as up north gets. But I have learned to be happy in whatever state I am in,(even if it is the state of confusion).
:nod:
:rose:
Seriously, I count my blessings.
I was born and raised in Oklahoma. Grew up seeing tornados form and then drop down. We would go into the cellar and be safe, so consequently I am not 'afraid' of tornados like some people. I get excited and sort of hyper about them. Usually when the sirens go off, I am outside looking at the sky to see where the thing is at, if it is indeed there. This last summer the sirens went off a couple of different times and my mom, brother and myself were all out in the yard, looking at the sky.
It has always amazed me that people live close to the ocean, close to volcanos, and close to earthquake fault lines. I know that probably sounds silly, but those are not places that I would choose to live by. Tornados I can get away from.
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:iconwolfepaw:
wolfepaw Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Yes, Texas really got blasted with Ike. I felt so bad for those people. I know just what they were going through. Now, tornadoes scare me. We get a few up here in Natchez, but nothing like you do in Oklahoma and in Kansas and other places in the middle of the country. You're right. I wouldn't want to live where there are earthquakes or near a volcano. No where to run! And at least you can run from hurricanes too. Usually with a lot more warning than with a tornado.
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:iconleawiggins:
LeaWiggins Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009
Right, well girl, I am going to get some sleep, now that the night is over. :bounce:
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:iconwolfepaw:
wolfepaw Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I just looked at some of your pictures. You have some really wonderful shots! I love the one of your family with the dragon. Your grandson certainly has some talent going on there. I guess he gets it from his grandmother, eh?

Do you do a lot of gardening? I was so struck by all the wonderful gardens all through the city when I was in London for a year and a half back in the late 70s. I would walk the streets and I'd go around a corner in the middle of downtown London, and there would be all these little parks, just bursting with beautiful flowers. And everyone I visited had a garden, even if it was just a small plot of land. Your house sounds lovely and it must be a pleasure to live near a lake with animals and birds to pretty up the scene.

Thank you so much for sharing a little bit of your life. It helps me to know you better. Take care, Roz.
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:iconrozrr:
Rozrr Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
So many people went through this Peggi. It must have been terrible for you. To look back now and know that you have come through and all all in one piece is the good thing.

Do you have a new house now? I hope so that one looks well past sorting out.

I live very close to a lake, about 50 feet or so away. It was made along with many others as part of the flood prevention scheme for Northampton UK. The house has been flooded about 15 years ago before my occupation. However it was due to a clogged up sluice at the bottom end. We all check it to make sure it stays clear. I have been here for 5+1/2 years and it has not been a problem... Hope it never is as I love the birds and spend hours watching them squabbling between themselves, then there is the goose patrol, when the swans are chasing the Canada Geese all day to keep them away from the nest.

It is called Kingfisher Lake and I do see them quite often, a flurry of colour catches my eye, however as soon as I pick up my rather tiny binoculars they are usually gone.
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:iconwolfepaw:
wolfepaw Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
It was terrible, but at least we weren't in the house when Katrina hit. Some many people who lived close to us who thought "We'll never flood. We've never flooded before and we have the levees", lost their lives because they stayed in their house and when the 17th St Canal floodwall breached (about 4 blocks from my house), the water rose so fast and so strong, they didn't have time to get to higher ground and were trapped in their houses. It was a horrible, horrible thing and it really didn't have to happen. The Army Corps of Engineers, whose responsibility it is/was to build and maintain the levees obviously weren't doing their jobs. A lot of people, including us, have sued the ACOE. I'm not holding my breath for a settlement.

We did get a new house in Natchez, MS, which is about 200 miles from New Orleans. I drive to New Orleans on Monday and drive home on Fridays. I still work in NO and I have a really good job (so far) and I don't think I could get anything comparable in Natchez. It's a lovely little town, but not many job opportunities there. Particularly in the medical research field. I keep hoping I'll win the lottery. That will probably happen sooner than getting a settlement from the ACOE.

Your house sounds like a paradise! Do you ever take any pictures of it? I love wildlife and to be able to live somewhere where you can watch them in their natural setting is a real treat. We live in the woods in Natchez and we have deer, chipmunks, raccoons, armadillos, birds by the bazillions, and various other critters that come to visit. I just love it there. It sounds like you love it near your lake, as well. Just keep that sluice clear and you'll probably never have a problem. Enjoy it to the fullest! You never know when things can be taken away from you.
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:iconrozrr:
Rozrr Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009  Professional Digital Artist
[link]

There are some images in the photography section of my gallery if you want to look. Some of the birds. Some of my family. The big dragon was made by my son. He did sculpture at Uni.

I have 3 grandsons and 1 granddaughter. Zuzu (named after Jimmy Stewarts little girl in it's a wonderful life.) is the little girl standing next to my son's partner in front of the dragon. The knight is one of my grandsons.

I must take more photos. It is a public park and there are always people walking round the lake or feeding the ducks. The house is a terraced one, however I really never see my neighbours. They all have cars. I don't. When they go out they go to the back of the property to the garages, I go to the front to walk a couple of minutes to the bus stop.

I rent the house privately. It is nice inside too. I have 3 bedrooms so plenty of room for family to come to stay. A large living room and a large kitchen diner. Small gardens front and back and a great flagged patio area with table and large umbrella to sit out to eat in warm weather. I like it very much. I am just on my own and have had great difficulty getting to know people. It is very hard when you are 64, single and have no money. However I do have my art and all my activist activities. That keeps me busy.

I don't have deer here but when I was married we did. We lived in the country then. No raccoons or chipmunks or armadillos in the UK either.

Keep on for your settlement, after all you have been through you deserve it. Pity you cannot do medical research on-line Peggi. That would be really good if you could work from home...
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:iconwolfepaw:
wolfepaw Featured By Owner Jan 21, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I meant to "reply" to this, but I commented instead. I do that sometimes, :dohtwo: , but I wanted you to know that I did reply to your lovely comment. So look at the comment above your last one on this page. Thanks, Roz.
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